Useful links

  • Europeana 1914-1918 – Explore stories It is a treasure trove of unique sources for anyone interested in WWI. Timely with the 100th anniversary upon us. The site offers access to digitized films from the period, institutional cultural heritage and official records alongside thousands of stories shared by the general public, illustrated with digital images of objects, letters, personal diaries, photographs, and other items from the period of the First World War.
  • Teacher Resources for Learning about Copyright and Fair Use ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning  Post from Ed tech and Mobile Learning Blog. “It is important we teach our students to be good digital citizens. They need to understand how to properly credit sources and documents they grab from Internet, and it is not always straightforward. The University of Texas offers a course entitled “Copyright Crash Course” that outlines in a very clear and eloquent language the different things we all need to know about copyright.” Links are given to a few important sections.
  • Legendary Lands: Umberto Eco on the Greatest Maps of Imaginary Places and Why They Appeal to Us | Brain Pickings “Celebrated Italian novelist, philosopher, essayist, literary critic, and list-lover Umberto Eco has had a long fascination with the symbolic and the metaphorical, extending all the way back to his vintage semiotic children’s books. Half a century later, he revisits the mesmerism of the metaphorical and the symbolic in The Book of Legendary Lands (public library) — an illustrated voyage into history’s greatest imaginary places, with all their fanciful inhabitants and odd customs, on scales as large as the mythic continent Atlantis and as small as the fictional location of Sherlock Holmes’s apartment.
  • Inside The Most Interesting Man In The World’s Personal Library [31 Photos] | The Roosevelts  ” Jay Walker made a lot of money starting Priceline.com. He spent his money collecting. The collection, dubbed the Library of Human Imagination, has grown into something epic that rivals any museum on Earth. the 3,600 square foot, three story facility features multilevel tiers, “floating” platforms, connecting stairways, glass-paneled bridges, dynamic lighting and is bursting at the seams with artifacts of all types. A truly amazing collection that celebrates human endeavour and preserves it for future generations.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Useful links

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Teaching Digital Citizenship in context

Teachable Moments for Digital Citizenship is a really useful infographic from a post by Nancy White – @NancyW.

She created it when she was looking for a resource about the importance of modeling good digital literacy skills for students. She explains that teaching digital citizenship as a separate curriculum is ok but finding the moments when they need the skill as part of undertaking a task, where the principles of digital citizenship can be applied, is the best way for them to learn and understand.

Allied to this infographic is a presentation (at the bottom of the post) where Nancy explained different aspects of digital citizenship called “9 Elements or themes of Digital Citizenship”. This presentation was created to explain digital literacy to parents but is a useful way to explain the concepts to fellow educators. These elements were:

  1. Digital Access
  2. Digital Commerce
  3. Digital Communication
  4. Digital Literacy
  5. Digital Etiquette
  6. Digital Law
  7. Digital Rights and Responsibilities
  8. Digital Health and Wellness
  9. Digital Security

The infographic uses the above themes and then puts them into a classroom context. It offers some direction for teachers who are working with students on particular tasks. It helps to map out what areas will be covered when students are asked to undertake each digital activity. It really goes without saying really that teachers must also show their students what’s expected of them. The themes need to be discussed with students when needed, allowing them to ask questions and explore ideas in a real situation. The final point that teachers,  and all responsible adults really,  need to model good digital citizenship themselves if they want young people to take these ideas on board I can’t agree with more completely. I have found with all things that if you say one thing but do another, you students will not take you or your message seriously.

Whilst many of the themes can recur in more than one context, Nancy has matched the most likely themes with the appropriate context:

  • Read: digital literacy and digital access
  • Watch: digital health and wellness and digital literacy
  • Find: digital access and digital literacy
  • Record: digital etiquette, digital rights and responsibilities also leading on to discussions about digital footprints and cyberbullying 
  • Curate: digital law and digital literacy
  • Connect: digital communication and digital safety and security
  • Collaborate: digital etiquette and digital communication
  • Create: digital rights and responsibilities and digital commerce
  • Write: digital communication and digital law

Teachable Moments for Digital Citizenshi

Slideshare presentation

Free music for student projects now on YouTube

I have been trying to teach the students good digital behaviours. When students are trying to create multimedia presentation we remind them about Creative Commons licences. When shown where to find images, sounds, videos that are allowed to be used they are more than happy to do the right thing. There are many times our students are looking for sounds or, more often, music to put the final polish on their multimedia project. There are a few I put onto a list available via our school intranet and linked to the sites. I often have to remind the boys about these sites so I was very pleased to learn the other day that YouTube is now offering music through their YouTube Audio Library. It is not a comprehensive library at the moment with about 150 royalty-free instrumental tracks people can use for free, indefinitely but it is a good start and on a site/platform that many students are very familiar with.

AudioLibrary-YouTube

The music embedded in the YouTube Audio Library is music that you can download to use in projects both online and offline. You can search the library of music according to:

  • Genre – Some of the genres you can choose from include: Alternative & Punk, Classical music, Country & Folk, Hip Hop & Rap, Jazz & Blues, Pop, Reggae and Rock.
  • Mood – Students are often interested in finding music for mood. Some of the moods represented musically include angry, bright, calm, dark, funky, happy, inspirational, romantic,and sad.
  • Instrument – Allows you to search for music according to the instrument being played in it. These include: Acoustic Guitar, Bass, Drums, Electric Guitar, Organ, Piano, Strings, Synth and Trumpet
  • Duration – Where you can search for clips ranging from 1to 25 minutes

You can listen to the tracks before downloading them as MP3 files. To download any tune you click on the arrow pointing downwards put on the line that has the title. You can also click on the star button next to it to add the tune to your favourite list. It really is very easy to use. I look forward to sharing it with our students next term.

AudioLibrary-Mood-download

There is also an opportunity to have a look at the most popular hits that people have downloaded by using the favourites list.

Useful Links

steps to success

Useful links

Everyone will eventually have one by shareski, on Flickr
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 Generic License  by  shareski 

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Useful Links

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