Photos and Illustrations about learning and teaching with technologies (L3T at FlickR)

I like the idea for this book project “Teaching and Learning with Technologies” They are looking for pictures and illustrations for each chapter.  A Flickr-group was started a while ago where people were asked to upload appropriate pictures under a creative-commons licenses.

The L3T project collect creative commons licensed photos and illustrations about learning and teaching with technologies. The pics are collected to illustrate an innovative text book project, but are free to use for everybody. Please spread the world and contribute to the L3T group at Flickr.

I like th idea because I know students who love to take photos and who have an interesting “eye”.  How much more fun for them to to take photos that might be used for this project. It also provides an opportunity to be part of a group that is contributing photos that they might also want to use. It is easy to become a member and share photos with this community on Technology Enhanced Learning.

Imagecodr – Attributing your CC Flickr images

My colleague Tania Sheko sent me a useful link this week. It was for a tool called ImageCodr. At the moment it only works with Flickr images but it is a great start.

I have been in Year 7 classes over the past few weeks. I have been showing them some of the ways they can better use some of the different search engines available to them. We have also been discussing plagiarism and when and how to quote. They have also been working on creating bibliographies that list all their information sources accurately. This has led onto questions about using images. The students, as well as staff, find it difficult to find and correctly use and attribute images (and music/sound). Many have never heard of Creative Commons although most know about copyright. They are all very interested in the CC sites and most like the idea of doing things that make them better digital citizens. One of the problems that many students have after they have located their images on the internet is understanding how to attribute correctly the images that they use.
Finding an image that has the licence best suited to their needs, getting the correct code for the image size required, giving the correct attributions with links back to the flickr page and the author’s profile can be difficult enough for teachers let alone students. This is where the ImageCodr tool comes in very handy. When I used it in my wiki the image was embedded with a clear CC logo, with the exact licensing terms for this specific image, as well as the name of the photographer and a link to their Flickr page. The image itself is linked to the image page, and correct alt text is used. You can you can see this when you hover over the image.  The CC logo links to the Creative Commons.org website and the license explanation page are also there.

I showed the students how they can find flickr images.There is FlickrCC and FlickrStorm, Compfight and well as the Flickr searching option. (I have posted about how to use all of these previously). We also used Google to find images with CC licences. 

Note: You have the option of using the ImageCodr to search for images also. 

Once you have found an image in flickr you only need to copy the URL of the image and then insert this into the Get Code page at ImageCodr.

After pasting in the flickr code you hit the Submit Query button and in no time ImageCodr brings up a screen that gives you everything you need to embed the image. You have:

  • Information about the Creative Commons Licence attached to the image.
  • Options to select the image size you would like to embed and when you have done this.
  •  A HTML code, that includes all of the attribution details attached to the image, will then be generated.
  • Lastly you can see what the image and the attribution will look like. 

The code can be copied and inserted into the webspace.It did not work for this blog, wordpress.com does not like the code but it worked beautifully when I wanted to added images to the Shakespeare wiki I have been working on. I am sure that there will be an answer to this but I haven’t investigated it yet.

Even if you can’t paste the HTML code into something easily the information is very useful. The CC licences are very simply and clearly stated to  help you understand them. You can then use that information to decide how best you can use it, even if you have to add the image in a more arduous way.

Useful Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Image sets – California Fires

It seems such a short time ago that a lot of Victoria was burning and many Victorians held a very real fear of the fires, that were raging through the state, would also burn them out. Many also knew others who were affected. A Royal Commission is now looking into the way the authorities handled the crisis and making recommendations to improve the collective response to future fires. Yesterday I had to drive though some of the countryside that was burnt out last summer but the trees and plants are starting to grow back. It always seems truly amazing how nature can bounce back.

I have been following what has been happening in Southern California (having visited this part of the world and knowing a couple of people who live there). We have many of the same problems with bush fires/wildfires. The Big Picture (Boston Globe) has published some amazing photos of the fires in southern California. There is so much that is similar: People trying to save their pets/livestock, exhausted firefighters, the amount of land the fire has raged through and the devastation left behind.

The American Red Cross also has a Flickr set,  2009 California Wildfires, that tells stories about the peoples and these fires as well. The Red Cross has also written up some tips and advice as well as a description of what they are doing “on the ground”. There is also a post (Sept 3) on the Station Fire, Los Angeles on the Flickr blog.

Bob Carey/American Red Cross.

Bob Carey/American Red Cross.

Bob Carey and American Red Cross.

Bob Carey and American Red Cross.

The pictures are incedible but it is so sad to be seeing that fires continue to occur.

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Useful Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The new Alice film and more digital storytelling

Tim Burton’s films are always a bit different. His next film is to be Alice in Wonderland. (See article in the DailyMail Online) He has released a video clip to give us a taste. With johnny Depp as the Mad Hatter, Helena Bonham Carter as the Queen, Alan Rickman as the Caterpillar and Stephen Fry as the Cat, it has a great cast as well as a director with more imagination than most. The trailer looks good but will he be able to do justice to the well-known and loved children’s book? Will his updated version change the story too much?

I believe that this film will add to the discussion about storytelling, as well as visual representions of the written word.

That some of our teachers are starting to allow for a wider range of storytelling in he curriculum is a good thing. It has allowed the curriculum o be more inclusive and enables the visually aware students to showcase their talents. Digital storytelling is still not widely accepted by all teachers, for various reasons. There are numerous ways to introduce digital storytelling into the classroom. Writing and telling stories using digital media brings up a host of questions that relate to narrative and structure, how you approach a lesson and manoeuvre around any technical problems. The later being the biggest factor in teachers not trying this option.

The blog The Digital Narrative: find your story with new media offers a wealth of ideas. The post on teaching methods is great for teachers who want to get started and are looking for ideas. A lot of tools are list with a comment about each. The link to how you might use Animoto was very good.

One simple approach to starting would be to consider creating digital images of words, then using these to build a story. A good introduction to this idea would be to explore 6 or 10 word written stories with students first. This would teach the students about economy of language, and would help them to develop a more complete narrative within these restrictions. Flickr has a group for images of single words and the site, Six Word Stories ( offers a collection of short short stories consisting of just six words. It was inspired by Ernest Hemingway’s famous challenge) would also be interesting for students to “play” with words. Brevity being the key element in this instance. Another Flickr group 09picture stories might also offer teachers and students a good starting point for digital storytelling. In fact there are many fantastic Flickr groups that could be used for inspiration.

I also like Moodstream. This is a tool that graphically shows students how you can put together ideas, images and sounds to create something more than the sum of the parts, but simpler than a longer film. I wrote a bit of a “how-to” in a post last year.

I am still working on encouraging teachers to give the various options a try and it is great when the students and staff have success.

Navify – Searching Wikipedia, Flickr and YouTube

My colleague Tania found this tool via the Free technology for teachers blog. I had seen Nibipedia, but Navify was a new tool for me to look at. It is a mash-up of Wikipedia, Flickr, and YouTube.

We all know that many of our students use Wikipedia,which may be developing into the world’s most extensive encyclopedias, as people continue to build on the information it contains. It does sometimes lack visual content, ie. pictures and more often videos, to assist with the written explanations. This can, at times, place a limit on its informative value. 

Navify seeks to redress this problem. Like Nibipedia, it attempts to match videos and images to Wikipedia articles.

Navify

Navify

To use Navify:

Go to the Navify site and do a standard Wikipedia search (no log in required) by simply entering your search term, just as you would in any search. The results will be returned in a tabbed form displaying:

  • Wikipedia article
  • related images and
  • related videos.

The images tab offers photos added by Wikipedia (or Navify users) and those automatically discovered on Flickr. It is very new at the moment but, as more users come on board, I can see this becoming a great source for relevant and useful images.

RandJ-Images

Video tab

Video tab

The videos tab works exactly the same way except that it finds related videos from YouTube.

Commenting on articles is also allowed. Navify is also supporting these comments using Disqus, so you will be able to read what people are saying about the Navify article pages.

The service is also planning on offering a music player so that users can listen to full related songs and audio content. So far I have found with my searching that Navify enhances the Wikipediaoption. It is still developing but has potential to become much greater. There seems to be no end to what tools people are thinking up to try and create better searching options. They won’t all survive and it will be the users who decide, in many cases.  It is a very interesting time for those of us interested in information searching.

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