Useful links

Educational Postcard:  Collaboration is by Ken Whytock, on Flickr
Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 Generic License   by  Ken Whytock 

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Useful links

Useful links

  • MinecraftEdu Takes Hold in Schools | School Library Journal “With Minecraft, learners of all ages work together to ultimately create a product that has value to them. “The simple interface provides students in the classroom with endless possibilities to demonstrate creativity, think critically, communicate, collaborate, and solve problems.” A Swedish student research study also showed that collaboration in Minecraft provided a more immersive problem-solving experience than group LEGO building.One great benefit of a framework like MinecraftEdu is the community surrounding it. MinecraftEdu offers discounted licenses to schools to get them started, along with a huge community of fellow educators who can help teachers and librarians sustain their programs. Educators from around the world post lesson plans, activities, tutorials, and worksheets for others who want to use their game worlds. They provide step-by-step instructions for teachers who are new to the game.”

  • “Ingrid Sundberg, a writer and children’s book illustrator, created a very useful infographic chart for anyone struggling with color names. The writer says that she loves to collect words that can help give her stories variety and depth.”

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Flipping the classroom: where do your sit?

I watched another report this week about how getting good marks is the main goal of education and students are doing anything to achieve the highest marks possible. This aim was not about being a better learner but about the game of beating the system. When marks, not learning or understanding how to learn, become the ultimate concern,the education system is in trouble.

I enjoy reading about what some schools and teachers are doing to get their students engaged their learning. I love seeing students taking responsibility for their own learning and even more, enjoying the process of learning. These students are giving themselves a good basis for being successful throughout their lives.

I have been reading more about flipped classrooms lately. These classes offer a type of learning that seems to fit the bill about allowing students to take responsibility for their learning.

One article entitled About flipped classrooms from the University of Queensland gives a good description of the roles and expectations of teachers and students in flipped classrooms and the important technologies. They also provided the diagram below about “the  Learning opportunities of the flipped classroom (adapted from Gerstein)”.  There are also useful links to more information.

I also found the infographic below, from a post “Is a Flipped Classroom Right for You?” by Jennifer Prescott on the We are Teachers site,  useful. It would help any teacher work out where they are in relation to “flipped classrooms”. It clearly sets out some of the basic ideas then leaves any reader with enough knowledge to investigate further.

Another great resource about this topic is a post on the coolcatteacher blog, “Preparing your students for flipped learning”, where Jon Bergmann talks with Vicki Davis about this with many examples given.

He explains the difference between flipped classrooms and flipped learning, which is more in-depth pedagogical method. Jon explains how to flip learning in areas without connectivity, how this system improves learning, and raises grades.

Flipped classrooms

Rubrics

Rhondda:

There are 2 opposing camps of teachers at my school – those who use rubrics and those that really dislike using them.
I believe there are some very good reasons to use rubrics although they have to be well-written.
This infographic offers an easy way to explain the benefits of using rubrics.

Originally posted on An Ethical Island:

I have recently been shocked at the fact that educators don’t really see the need for a rubric. They either find them too specific or too vague. But, I am not really sure they are seeing the big picture on this one. Rubrics are great for students and teachers.

Here are a few benefits:

Rubrics

What else would you add? How have they helped you?

~Mia

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Useful Links

mirrors to windows by Kackpr, on Flickr
Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 Generic License   by  Kackpr 

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Need a science project? Try Science Buddies

We challenge our Year 7 and 8 science students to do an investigative study in science and technology.  The  year 7 boys have to find something to do with the topic “light”, chosen because this year is the International Year of Light.

Members of the library staff have been working with the classes to assist with developing their information literacy skills. It has been going very well and the boys love the idea that the have some choice with their topic.

When we were preparing tips for the boys I came across the Science Buddies site.

Science buddies - homepg

This is a great website for teachers and students. Science Buddies is a very useful resource that offers many ideas about science projects. The people behind it are a non-profit making group who are concerned with developing science enrichment tool for young people.

It ranges from helping with the choice a project and a framework for investigations and experiments to an ask an expert forum and a Science Fair Project Guide..

Last week a student had to change his topic and he used the topic selection wizard to help him come up with a new idea. This little tool asks the student a lot of questions about their interests and understandings and capabilities.

Once you give some basic information you start the selection survey

topic selection

The answers are either yes, sometimes or no. After completing the questions you are offered an annotated list of suggested topics that fit with the answers given.

topic selection survey

The recommendations are clearly described with the most relevant coming up first.

Recommendations

There are more then 1,100 project ideas, organised into categories and levels of difficulty.

It is a great way for students to develop their understanding of science through well-designed, scientific experimentation.

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