Reading – Graphic for choosing a book

We have spent a lot of time working with students and staff so they have something to read in the school holidays. I have been reading and reviewing some YA fiction on GoodReads as have our student reading group but thought I would also share this infographic I came across the other day. I am also thinking about our kids creating one of their advice infographics. What would they choose.

Note to self: get them to create one for next holidays.

What Do You Feel Like Reading Infographic

Useful links

  • MinecraftEdu Takes Hold in Schools | School Library Journal “With Minecraft, learners of all ages work together to ultimately create a product that has value to them. “The simple interface provides students in the classroom with endless possibilities to demonstrate creativity, think critically, communicate, collaborate, and solve problems.” A Swedish student research study also showed that collaboration in Minecraft provided a more immersive problem-solving experience than group LEGO building.One great benefit of a framework like MinecraftEdu is the community surrounding it. MinecraftEdu offers discounted licenses to schools to get them started, along with a huge community of fellow educators who can help teachers and librarians sustain their programs. Educators from around the world post lesson plans, activities, tutorials, and worksheets for others who want to use their game worlds. They provide step-by-step instructions for teachers who are new to the game.”

  • “Ingrid Sundberg, a writer and children’s book illustrator, created a very useful infographic chart for anyone struggling with color names. The writer says that she loves to collect words that can help give her stories variety and depth.”

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Reading – Choosing what to read in the holidays?

It is the end of Semester 1 and our 2 week holiday period is almost here. Many of the boys have been asked to read over the holidays and classes have come to the library for them to find something.

We have e-books as well as hardcopy books. Many of our boys like the later and subject matter and the cover play a part in their choice but for some it is the size of the book (number of pages) that is the deciding factor. We often explain to these boys that if the book does not interest them then the book will be too long whatever the length. It is with these thoughts in mind that I came across the following infographic.

It is an interesting take on recommending reading material and is based on the “average” person’s reading speed (300 words per minute) and the number of words in the novel. Of course reading difficulty would also come into play so it offers only a rough guide to the times suggested but I thought it might make an interesting talking point if i showed it in the library.

Please include attribution to PersonalCreations.com with this graphic.

How Long Does it Take to Read

 

Useful links

outer reaches by KeriMelhorn, on Flickr
Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 2.0 Generic License   by  KeriMelhorn 

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Useful links

@sirkenrobinson on Standardisation by mrkrndvs, on Flickr
Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License   by  mrkrndvs 

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

YA book review. Head of the River by Pip Harry

Head of the River

Head of the River by Pip Harry

Head of the River is not simply a novel about sport. It is about so much more. It is ultimately about friendship, growing up, relationships, identity, insecurities and anxieties when you are becoming an adult and family bonds. Sport is the mechanism but it is not an “issues” book.

It is an interesting read, looking at the pressures placed on young people the world of elite school sport. Money and prestige play a big part in this rather insular world where winning seems all-consuming.

This novel tells the story of Cristian and Leni Posescu who are twins on rowing scholarships. There are high expectations that they will perform well, partly because their parents are both medal winning Olympians and partly because they must maintain high performances to stay at the school. The pressure to do well and win the Head of the River eights, in both boys and girls sections, place almost unbearable pressures on both them and others in their circle.

The narrative unfolds with the voices of Cristian and Leni in alternating chapters as they explain their struggles. Each is trying create a balance in their lives whilst finding a place for study, working out their relationships as well as keeping up with the rigorous training regime in preparation for the final race.  Each finds out that not everything can be achieved the way they want it to.

At the end of the novel, the love they have within their family, and the support they give to each other, leaves the reader with a positive impression of life beyond school.

An interview with the author about this books can be found at http://www.kids-bookreview.com/2014/1…

There is a review here and here.

Teachers notes can be found here for encouraging further discussion.

This book raises some real-world issues that younger athletes may experience when they seek to excel in a sport. The boys are exposed to the use of anabolic steroids and performance enhancing drugs. The consequences of this use comes to light in a way that introduces some topical questions about sporting culture and the detection of drug cheats as well as the pressure placed on young athletes to perform at elite levels

Book trailer for the novel below.

Useful links

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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