Useful links

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Tips for writing a blog post

It is the start of our school year and i have been talking with teachers about some of their class activities. We have had some year 9 students in English classes respond to literature – novels and poetry, in class blog. We are always tinkering with how we present the idea of a blog to the students.

Whilst looking for new ides to add to my collection of information about blogging I came across the following infographic below, “10 Elements Of Style Of Post Writing“. It was on Marko Saric’s  HowToMakeMyBlog  It offers some good advice for bloggers based  on a book about writing recommended by author Stephen King, The Elements of Style by Strunk and White. The post and infographic has some rules of grammar and most of it is a good guide for anyone who has an interest in writing in general, not just writing for a blog.  These writing tips could improve writing by making content more coherent and interesting for any readers.

I have added it to me digital folio of useful tips for class blogging and will be using these tips with our students.

10 Elements Of Writing Style [Infographic]
Like this infographic? Get more writing advice at http://www.HowToMakeMyBlog.com.

Social Media posting – infographic to download plus useful links

In keeping with some of the discussions this week I was very interested in the post What do I post where? by Sylvia Rosenthal Tolesano (@Langwitches).

It was a great visual representation that I think would help explain social media to a number of the staff at our school.

Sylvia is a leading teacher in the digital educational world and over the past few years have found the posts and articles she writes for her own and other blogs inspirational. She is also a great collaborator and has made this poster available as a download for others to use.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Imagecodr – Attributing your CC Flickr images

My colleague Tania Sheko sent me a useful link this week. It was for a tool called ImageCodr. At the moment it only works with Flickr images but it is a great start.

I have been in Year 7 classes over the past few weeks. I have been showing them some of the ways they can better use some of the different search engines available to them. We have also been discussing plagiarism and when and how to quote. They have also been working on creating bibliographies that list all their information sources accurately. This has led onto questions about using images. The students, as well as staff, find it difficult to find and correctly use and attribute images (and music/sound). Many have never heard of Creative Commons although most know about copyright. They are all very interested in the CC sites and most like the idea of doing things that make them better digital citizens. One of the problems that many students have after they have located their images on the internet is understanding how to attribute correctly the images that they use.
Finding an image that has the licence best suited to their needs, getting the correct code for the image size required, giving the correct attributions with links back to the flickr page and the author’s profile can be difficult enough for teachers let alone students. This is where the ImageCodr tool comes in very handy. When I used it in my wiki the image was embedded with a clear CC logo, with the exact licensing terms for this specific image, as well as the name of the photographer and a link to their Flickr page. The image itself is linked to the image page, and correct alt text is used. You can you can see this when you hover over the image.  The CC logo links to the Creative Commons.org website and the license explanation page are also there.

I showed the students how they can find flickr images.There is FlickrCC and FlickrStorm, Compfight and well as the Flickr searching option. (I have posted about how to use all of these previously). We also used Google to find images with CC licences. 

Note: You have the option of using the ImageCodr to search for images also. 

Once you have found an image in flickr you only need to copy the URL of the image and then insert this into the Get Code page at ImageCodr.

After pasting in the flickr code you hit the Submit Query button and in no time ImageCodr brings up a screen that gives you everything you need to embed the image. You have:

  • Information about the Creative Commons Licence attached to the image.
  • Options to select the image size you would like to embed and when you have done this.
  •  A HTML code, that includes all of the attribution details attached to the image, will then be generated.
  • Lastly you can see what the image and the attribution will look like. 

The code can be copied and inserted into the webspace.It did not work for this blog, wordpress.com does not like the code but it worked beautifully when I wanted to added images to the Shakespeare wiki I have been working on. I am sure that there will be an answer to this but I haven’t investigated it yet.

Even if you can’t paste the HTML code into something easily the information is very useful. The CC licences are very simply and clearly stated to  help you understand them. You can then use that information to decide how best you can use it, even if you have to add the image in a more arduous way.

Useful Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.