Why we should include infographics in our teaching

Many of our students have told me that prefer lesson that involve some visuals to aid their learning. They like images too stimulate their imaginations, explain data and to help them see connections. The infographic below offers 10 different reasons why we should use visual material when we are in our classrooms as well as what might work best for various types of  information.
Types of Visual Content to Improve Learner Engagement Infographic
Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics

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Learning and games

I like the way this infographic explains the difference between game-based learning and gamification. We use both to create inreresting learning experiences in our school.

An Ethical Island

Here’s a brief- very brief- overview of different types of game-learning.

gamelearning
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This work by Mia MacMeekin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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Scaffold Like an Ant- A simple scaffolding example

A simple but effective way to encourage deeper understanding

An Ethical Island

I am teaching a class where I allow the students a set amount of time to draw out what they know about a subject. Today, the students did their pre-class work, then came to class, and we began to draw things out. At first they look at me a little funny when I ask them to draw. Then, they dig in and explain what they think the subject is all about. Usually it takes about 25% of class time to get them through this phase. Today, they wanted to remain in this drawing/ scaffolding phase. They were going deeper than any class has ever gone in their reasoning and understanding of a difficult subject. It was pretty cool.

Here is what I do in my classes… (the ant is an analogy, I don’t get to teach about ants).

Ant Scaffolding

What would you add?

~Mia

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More on Student Groups – Infographic 2

A second great infographic by Mia MacMeekin It offers an addititional infographic that compliments the first, with similar ideas but also a few different ideas.

  1. Bond
  2. Supplies
  3. Intervene (If they are struggling)
  4. Praise
  5. Research steps (clear and simple)
  6. Freedom (the one I particularly like)

The freedom to:

  • explore
  • fail
  • have fun
  • be creative
  • do it their way

An Ethical Island

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6 ideas for Forming Effective Student Teams and Groups

I have been working teachers and their year 7 students. They have been working in literature circle groups and others on some research activities.
It is interesting watching the dynamics and how different groups and classes perform their tasks. It is easy to put students into groups but creating effective student groups takes a bit more work.

I liked the following infographic by Mia MacMeekin as it offers a few ideas to help assist teachers to make groups more productive but still student lead. It is logical and not really new but it helps to remind us that these form a range of the approaches, particularly useful as “one-size never fits all.”

There are 6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups

  1. Create a ZPD Zone. This refers to Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal development. He frames student ability in terms of developmental range. This is different for each student and understanding the different ranges for the students can assist in making decisions about the groups.
  2. Cognitive Dissonance is Good. Encourage the student to stretch themselves beyond what is comfortable
  3. Numbers Count. (4-6 being optimum)
  4. Praise and recognition of good group behaviours)
  5. Give Them Something to Do. Use the PBL (Problem-based learning) approach which works well in a group setting allowing for different knowledge and strengths of all in the group.
  6. Facilitate the team bonding by assisting in the initial brainstorming activity. The trust that comes with good team bonding allows everyone a voice and participation by all.

An Ethical Island

1 Step in the Process:

studentgroups
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This work by Mia MacMeekin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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