Imagecodr – Attributing your CC Flickr images

My colleague Tania Sheko sent me a useful link this week. It was for a tool called ImageCodr. At the moment it only works with Flickr images but it is a great start.

I have been in Year 7 classes over the past few weeks. I have been showing them some of the ways they can better use some of the different search engines available to them. We have also been discussing plagiarism and when and how to quote. They have also been working on creating bibliographies that list all their information sources accurately. This has led onto questions about using images. The students, as well as staff, find it difficult to find and correctly use and attribute images (and music/sound). Many have never heard of Creative Commons although most know about copyright. They are all very interested in the CC sites and most like the idea of doing things that make them better digital citizens. One of the problems that many students have after they have located their images on the internet is understanding how to attribute correctly the images that they use.
Finding an image that has the licence best suited to their needs, getting the correct code for the image size required, giving the correct attributions with links back to the flickr page and the author’s profile can be difficult enough for teachers let alone students. This is where the ImageCodr tool comes in very handy. When I used it in my wiki the image was embedded with a clear CC logo, with the exact licensing terms for this specific image, as well as the name of the photographer and a link to their Flickr page. The image itself is linked to the image page, and correct alt text is used. You can you can see this when you hover over the image.  The CC logo links to the Creative Commons.org website and the license explanation page are also there.

I showed the students how they can find flickr images.There is FlickrCC and FlickrStorm, Compfight and well as the Flickr searching option. (I have posted about how to use all of these previously). We also used Google to find images with CC licences. 

Note: You have the option of using the ImageCodr to search for images also. 

Once you have found an image in flickr you only need to copy the URL of the image and then insert this into the Get Code page at ImageCodr.

After pasting in the flickr code you hit the Submit Query button and in no time ImageCodr brings up a screen that gives you everything you need to embed the image. You have:

  • Information about the Creative Commons Licence attached to the image.
  • Options to select the image size you would like to embed and when you have done this.
  •  A HTML code, that includes all of the attribution details attached to the image, will then be generated.
  • Lastly you can see what the image and the attribution will look like. 

The code can be copied and inserted into the webspace.It did not work for this blog, wordpress.com does not like the code but it worked beautifully when I wanted to added images to the Shakespeare wiki I have been working on. I am sure that there will be an answer to this but I haven’t investigated it yet.

Even if you can’t paste the HTML code into something easily the information is very useful. The CC licences are very simply and clearly stated to  help you understand them. You can then use that information to decide how best you can use it, even if you have to add the image in a more arduous way.

Images and words: using, manipulating, playing

Whilst I was on-line this morning up popped a couple of emails, One was sent by a teacher and it included the photograph below.

I looked around the web and found a blog, CFRU 93.3fm Election Radio, which posted the photo with the following text

It would seem that the credit crunch is having a really significant impact in the UK.

Even those more fortunate than most are having to make difficult decisions to ensure that their standard of living is maintained.

I don’t know if they created the photo but it certainly brought a laugh to students and teachers alike. I had a great discussion last week with the boys in the reading club/group. We started off talking about some books, then got om to how the media manipulated readers by the language used in their stories and finally discussed the economic crisis and the speeches made by politicians (what do they really mean?)

I was sitting in the library and around me there was a display of newspaper headlines for this year. I had collected these news banners for the morning delivery of papers over this year. So many words in bold print saying…?

These headlines have caused quite a bit of discussion with the students when they have come into the library over the past week.

I then started thinking about what activities you might base on these headlines. They could be the basis of some interesting approaches to language. Continue reading

CompFight: another way to find CC photos on Flickr

I am often looking for pictures/photos in the public domain that I (and/or my students) can use in things we are creating, be it blogs, wikis, video clips or other projects. I have discussed before that students are happy to “legally” use images as long as they know how to and that it is not too complicated. The Flickr collection offers a lot but it is not always easy to find what you need. There are many who have developed all sorts of interesting tools for making better use of Flickr. have been using FlickrCC and FlickrStorm as my first port of call although I also like Tag Galaxy as well, to find interesting images.

FlickrCC makes free to use photos, in Creative Commons, easy to find. FlickrStorm is another nice search tool that has some useful features such as the ability to look for CC photos only and create a list of images that can be shared.  There is the “how-to” on FlickrStorm by ICT guy as well.  

Another search tool I have come across, via CogDog is CompFight

This is a very simple search tool to use. If you click on:

  • Tags you will have the option of searching through all the tags or all text
  • Creative Commons is a link to go between all, off or commercial searches
  • Seek Originalallows you to choose whether or not you want original images
  • One caution,I do not know how the Safe optionreally works. Typing in”sex”, which the boys are wont to do at times, results in many images of naked bodies, in various poses. Of course you explain about how to search appropriately when searching the Internet in general but I would not rely on the “safe” mode to filter inappropriate images out.

The results of a search are displayed as a thumbnail, without any of the photographs details, which means you can get many thumbnails on the page at a time and, as you can scroll down, the next batches are loaded so you don’t have to click onto the pagination tag. It is very easy to compare and get an overview of the images available and simple for students to use.