Big Posters

Examples of the posters made from the BlockPoster site. The MCG (with 30cm ruler at the side)
MCG from 4 PDF pages put together

MCG from 4 PDF pages put together

I also tried out a much larger size. From the example below I printed each page with a border. I guillotined one side off and used the other to glue the pages together, as above. You could use separate sheets and work on a display in a mosaic style. I pinned these page up quickly but this morning quite a few students had a good look at it and found it interesting.
Block Arcade - 3 pages wide

Block Arcade - 3 pages wide

Making BIG posters and other things

I am working on a new display for our library. We have a huge wall that is covered with black material. I am always aware that even A3 paper looks minuscule. I thought I would try the BlockPoster site. The claim is that you can make your small image into a very large one. It is also a free tool.

 I wanted a big picture of the MCG (to go with a AFL football display) I clicked on start, loaded up my image (max file size 1MB).

Next I decided just how large a poster I wanted. It was very quick to choose how big you want it to be: the default is 4 pages wide (but you can change this),  portrait or landscape, A4 or letter (US).

select size

select size

You continue and in a matter of seconds the pdf is ready for you to download. You can then print out your poster and construct it.

Download PDF file

Download PDF file

Everything fits together perfectly. I used a guillotine to slice off the white borders. There is a gallery that you can visit to see posters that others have created and you can email a photo of your own finished creation as well.

It took less than 2 minutes to create a large poster.  After I had done this, a teacher came in with a small image of a gameboard she needed. It was too small and needed to be larger than A3. We used the Block Poster site  and created the makings for 6 boards. The students will construct the boards (stick them together) and the boards will be laminated for future use. It was all so quick and simple.

Value adding by publishers

The publishers are catching onto the whole idea of using the newer technologies to advertise and develop an interest in their publications and authors. The reason behind this may be commercial but it has a lot of great spin offs for those of us who are working in schools, trying to promote reading and increase literacy.

In the past two posts I have touched on the book trailers but there are also a growing number of podcasts available for use by us.

Penguin Publishers have been putting up podcasts for a while now. Penguin USA has a page for current podcasts and developed quite a large archive of podcasts that are available to us.

Simon and Schuster, with their “SimonSays podcasts” has a site that offers, weekly, interviews with many different authors and includes excerpts read from their audiobooks.They also have a large archive of podcasts.

The UK publisher Faber and Faber has a new podcast page on its website. This is is worth keeping an eye on on. On these initial podcasts the interviews include Peter Carey, discussing Australia and counterculture in “His Illegal self”, and Junot Diaz talks about his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel ‘The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao’ and discusses ideas of race and identity and mythology. The whole Faber website is easy to navigate, and has a simple, uncluttered feel. There is also a great number of past Faber book designs on this Flickr photostream page.

And speaking of covers, Black Dog Books make many of their covers, author images and chapter extracts available for BDB downloads that helps us advertise the books and create better promotional material for our literature collection.

This is only a small collection but a good place to start.