Literature by numbers.

Always looking for some interesting ways to approach literature, books and reading for our boys, I came across the fun infographic below. This is an appealing infographic (from the DailyInfographic site) that takes a look at the numbers behind some famous works of fiction. There are word counts of classic novels as well as modern works such as Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Lord of the Rings. Novellas, haiku, epic poems as well as works by particular authors (Hemingway, Shakespeare and Austen) are explained by their numbers.

Words by Numbers: Famous Literature Infographic

Choosing books for young readers

A few weeks ago I wrote a post called Reading – Choosing what to read in the holidays? and included an infographic. In the first week of our school holidays I have spent my time looking after three primary school children. Two are just beginning to read on their own. The weather has been cold so although we have spent some time outside, we have also done a few indoor activities as well. Reading with the two boys was part of it. It was a great way to share my enjoyment of some of my favourite children’s books. The boys enjoyed snuggling up and being read to as well as having a go themselves. The Peter Rabbit stories are currently being televised as a cartoon and this was a great starting point.

I thought would share this infographic that seeks to give some advice about books for younger readers if  you are interested in some more  ideas about what might make good starting point. The following is another infographic, created by Personal Creations, that might be a useful starting point. They have analyzed over 50 popular children’s books, from the classic The Tale of Peter Rabbit to the more contemporary bestseller, Harry Potter and given some idea about how long it might take younger readers to finish the books.

They followed the fluency standards for elementary grades, based on academic fluency standards (US) and calculated how long it takes kids to read these books.

How Long It Takes Kids to Read Popular Books shows each book accompanied with the number of words, and the reading time – split into three grades: 2, 3, and 4.

Wondering where your child falls in this list? Follow the fluency standards for elementary grades 1 – 6 below and you can quickly calculate how long it’ll take your eager reader.

Grade 1: 50 words per minute (wpm)
Grade 2: 70 wpm
Grade 3: 100 wpm
Grade 4: 130 wpm
Grade 5: 140 wpm
Grade 6: 160 wpm

Reading comprehension is not built into calculations and it is important to talk about what the young reader has understood about the text and illustrations, but most of all the activity needs to be about encouraging an enjoyment of reading.

Please include attribution to PersonalCreations.com with this graphic.

How Long It Takes To Read Popular Kids Books by PersonalCreations.com

Reading – Graphic for choosing a book

We have spent a lot of time working with students and staff so they have something to read in the school holidays. I have been reading and reviewing some YA fiction on GoodReads as have our student reading group but thought I would also share this infographic I came across the other day. I am also thinking about our kids creating one of their advice infographics. What would they choose.

Note to self: get them to create one for next holidays.

What Do You Feel Like Reading Infographic

Reading – Choosing what to read in the holidays?

It is the end of Semester 1 and our 2 week holiday period is almost here. Many of the boys have been asked to read over the holidays and classes have come to the library for them to find something.

We have e-books as well as hardcopy books. Many of our boys like the later and subject matter and the cover play a part in their choice but for some it is the size of the book (number of pages) that is the deciding factor. We often explain to these boys that if the book does not interest them then the book will be too long whatever the length. It is with these thoughts in mind that I came across the following infographic.

It is an interesting take on recommending reading material and is based on the “average” person’s reading speed (300 words per minute) and the number of words in the novel. Of course reading difficulty would also come into play so it offers only a rough guide to the times suggested but I thought it might make an interesting talking point if i showed it in the library.

Please include attribution to PersonalCreations.com with this graphic.

How Long Does it Take to Read

 

Rubrics

Rhondda:

There are 2 opposing camps of teachers at my school – those who use rubrics and those that really dislike using them.
I believe there are some very good reasons to use rubrics although they have to be well-written.
This infographic offers an easy way to explain the benefits of using rubrics.

Originally posted on An Ethical Island:

I have recently been shocked at the fact that educators don’t really see the need for a rubric. They either find them too specific or too vague. But, I am not really sure they are seeing the big picture on this one. Rubrics are great for students and teachers.

Here are a few benefits:

Rubrics

What else would you add? How have they helped you?

~Mia

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Teach coding to students, it’s an important skill.

Our Minister for Education has been praising the review of the “National Curriculum” This report has caused quite a lot of angst across the board but  technology in particular may well be phased back, especially before year 9. Whilst most agree that there is a  crowded curriculum many do not believe that studying  ICT contributes to a this unnecessarily. Many will argue that ICT skills are fundamental and it is critical that they should form part of the core curriculum, along with numeracy and literacy, in this increasingly digitized world.

Today I came across this well designed together infographic that explains how teaching coding to students, even young students, has several benefits and  why teachers must teach coding to their students. It is offers a very good argument for teaching the skills.

It was created by Kodable and is an iOS app that teaches children various coding and programming concepts through a variety of maze activities.The free version allows users to play the first 30 levels (Smeeborg World) for free.  The Pro version (has a small fee) offers full access, giving you a total of 4 Worlds. I have only seen the work of others as I use microsoft and android options.

Please include attribution to Kodable with this graphic.

5 Reasons to Teach Kids to Code

A few links to other posts/tools that might be useful:

7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills Digital learning specialist Anna Adam provides a quick overview of seven apps that are appropriate for teaching younger children one of the most critical 21st century skills: coding.

Ten Resources for Helping Students Learn to Code and Program  by Richard Byrne on his blog Free technology for teachers. Very well explained uses for 10 tools.

Engaging 6th Graders With Coding A guest post on Richard Byrne’s Free technology for teachers where a teacher discusses how she approached teaching coding to her class.

Scratch Tutorials provides guidance on getting starting with Scratch with kids. Scratch is a website from MIT specifically for kids. Kids can program stories, games, and animation. It’s so empowering for kids to be able to learn how to build their own programs.

A useful pinterest board is Coding or Programming for students that collects all sorts of resources.

Tips for writing a blog post

It is the start of our school year and i have been talking with teachers about some of their class activities. We have had some year 9 students in English classes respond to literature – novels and poetry, in class blog. We are always tinkering with how we present the idea of a blog to the students.

Whilst looking for new ides to add to my collection of information about blogging I came across the following infographic below, “10 Elements Of Style Of Post Writing“. It was on Marko Saric’s  HowToMakeMyBlog  It offers some good advice for bloggers based  on a book about writing recommended by author Stephen King, The Elements of Style by Strunk and White. The post and infographic has some rules of grammar and most of it is a good guide for anyone who has an interest in writing in general, not just writing for a blog.  These writing tips could improve writing by making content more coherent and interesting for any readers.

I have added it to me digital folio of useful tips for class blogging and will be using these tips with our students.

10 Elements Of Writing Style [Infographic]
Like this infographic? Get more writing advice at http://www.HowToMakeMyBlog.com.

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