Useful Sites

poets.org | Academy of American Poets This American site can be search by looking up a poet or poem. It includes featured thematic lists such as “love poems” and “black history month.”
Famous Poets and Poems – Read and Enjoy Poetry This site offers an eclectic mix of poetry, both modern and classic. There is a list of the top 50 poems, famous quotes by poets and you can search thematically.
Poetry Foundation This site includes established and classic poets. You can click on “poems and poets” and browse for poems. Searches can be done by themes or by browsing by poem type.
poetryarchive.org | Poetry archive This an archive of poets reading their own work. It isaccompanied by the written text. It also contains lesser known poets and is searchable by theme, the poet, or a poem.
Purdue OWL: MLA Formatting and Style Guide This is Purdue University’s Citation site, and links directly to the MLA section. It is a valuable resources for all students who are looking for citation information!
R U 4 R.E.A.L? Strategy for Website Evaluation Slideshow that sets out how to evaluate websites using the pneumonic R.E.A.L. Explains how you tell if a website is credible or could be used for a school research project by explaining the R.E.A.L. strategy. Puts up the sorts of questions students should ask to evaluate a website’s credibility before using its information for a school project.
Critical Evaluation – Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Everything Kathy Schrock has created a long list of links to iuseful information about how to critically evaluate information found on the Web. This page includes forms for teaching the process, articles for learning about the aspect of literacy, and a list of bogus sites to use to showcase that all things on the Web are not real.
Evaluating Internet Resources This post outines the Criteria for Evaluation of resources. “Students need to learn to evaluate the quality of information they find on the web as well as other information resources such as books, magazines, CD-ROM, and television.” Students should be skeptical of everything they find. They need to be encouraged to compare and contrast different information resources. Also has links to hoax sites that can be used to to explain how to evaluate information.
Evaluating Sources – Use the C.R.A.P. Test! — Mercer University Libraries When undertaking any research you will need to evaluate all of them to determine whether or not they are reliable and relevant to whatever your project is. It does not matter if you have a book, article, website, or other source, you can use the C.R.A.P. Test* to decide whether or not it’s worth including in your resource list. This piece outine what is involved in the “C.R.A.P.” test.
Getting ‘REAL’ with web evaluation – tips and tools to develop information literacy | LinkingLearning Using the ideas of Alan November, who presents a great strategy for students to apply whenever they are researching and need to confirm the reliability of the source of their information. The pneumonic ‘REAL’ illustrates the step that can be used to test the any site.
5 Components of Information Literacy – YouTube“Published on 29 Jan 2014. Information literacy can be divided into five different categories: Identify, Find, Evaluate, Apply, and Acknowledge. View academic and real world examples for each component to discover why information literacy is important to success in college or university and in life.”
Why can’t I just Google? – YouTube “Uploaded on 9 Feb 2010 Information is everywhere! Its just so easy to Google and use something that looks relevant… so why cant you just Google?”

Why Technology in Classrooms Doesn’t Always Boost Scores An interesting look at how technology should be used in the classroon for it to be effective. “HAVING technology means nothing. You have to: 1. Have technology in the classroom, 2. Students must have access, and 3. Teachers must know how to teach with tech.  A number of different ideas for “using Technology in Ways that Improve Classroom Learning” are then explained

Free Technology for Teachers: Streamline Your Feedback Process in Google Docs “JoeZoo Express doesn’t limit you to using just feedback phrases that they have listed. You can create your own feedback phrases and explanations.

Teachers who want to use rubrics to give feedback and grades can do so within JoeZoo Express. JoeZoo offers a free rubric builder tool. You can customize the rubric to meet your specific needs. The rubrics that you create can be saved and inserted into students’ documents when you are grading their work.”

Useful links

Educational Postcard: A Growth Mindset s by Ken Whytock, on Flickr
Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 Generic License   by  Ken Whytock 

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Such was life – SLV Blog

SLV_blog-Such_was_life

I have been following the Such Was Life blog from the State Library of Victoria (SLV) for a while now. The blog began in October 2012 and has been showcasing the material in the SLV’s collection. The blog explores items from the Library collections that relate to Australia’s past, and these are many and varied.

From their own description:

Such is life,’ bushranger Ned Kelly is reputed to have said in his final moments. These words are also a great way of defining history, and history (specifically Australian history) is what this blog is all about. Here we’ll explore Australian histories found in the collections of the State Library of Victoria. We’ll highlight both new acquisitions and classic resources, including: books, journals, newspapers, manuscripts, pictures, maps and ephemera

We will showcase resources that are available online, and those sitting in our stacks just waiting to be discovered.

I have found many of the post fascinating as they highlight different aspects of their collection.  This year with the 100 year commemorations of the WWI, our study of the text “all Quiet on the Western Front as well as the Year 12 Australian history course, their WWI post have been very topical.

The list of post about items about WWI include:

  • First shot fired There is some debate about where this actually happened but the is are a lot of documents that show that many in Australia believe that it was from Point Nepean as a German ship tried to leave Port Phillip Bay on the 5th Aug 1914
  • WWI poetry Poetry spans all aspects of war, from enlistment to conscription, to loss and battle descriptions. Further information to the uses of poetry and to poems themselves.
  • Death Ballots: Australia’s World War I conscription referendums Some description of the two referendums and other related materials. great starting point for understanding how Australians felt at the time.
  • Greeting from the trenches: World War I postcards Postcards were a popular way to communicate with those at home in WWI. 1916, Corporal Thomas O’Halloran sent dozens of embroidered souvenir postcards from the front lines in France to his family. The Halloran postcard collection online.
  • From Ararat to the Dardenelles: World War I through newspapers A reminder about the wealth of information about our history now available to us through the digitised issues of our newspapers. Over 70 Victorian newspapers covering 1914 to 1918 are now freely available on Trove.
  • World War I colour patches  Colour patches were worn on Australian soldiers’ uniforms to show which unit they belonged to. In WWI there were many different patches and this post offers links to finding out more about them.
  • Commemorating your ANZACS. This was about a grant that recently finished but there was more useful information here about our service man and women. There was also advice about how to find out more about individuals who served in the Australian military.

If you would like to find out more about local servicemen and women, head to our research guide World War I: researching soldiers. It provides a step-by-step guide to finding soldiers’ service records, and discovering what battles and campaigns they were involved in. The guide also gives advice about researching the lives of Australian nurses. Our guide to key family history sources will help you to track down other key biographical details, like birth, marriage and death dates, what other jobs people held, and where people lived in their local community. Finally, our guide to publishing your family history will step you through the process of making your research available online or as a book.

There are links in the posts to primary sources available in in the library, digitised resources that can be viewed, the History section of the Ergo site and links to related material are also useful. It is a great resource and well worth following to remind you about what a fantastic treasure we have in our State Library.

Useful links

  • Europeana 1914-1918 – Explore stories It is a treasure trove of unique sources for anyone interested in WWI. Timely with the 100th anniversary upon us. The site offers access to digitized films from the period, institutional cultural heritage and official records alongside thousands of stories shared by the general public, illustrated with digital images of objects, letters, personal diaries, photographs, and other items from the period of the First World War.
  • Teacher Resources for Learning about Copyright and Fair Use ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning  Post from Ed tech and Mobile Learning Blog. “It is important we teach our students to be good digital citizens. They need to understand how to properly credit sources and documents they grab from Internet, and it is not always straightforward. The University of Texas offers a course entitled “Copyright Crash Course” that outlines in a very clear and eloquent language the different things we all need to know about copyright.” Links are given to a few important sections.
  • Legendary Lands: Umberto Eco on the Greatest Maps of Imaginary Places and Why They Appeal to Us | Brain Pickings “Celebrated Italian novelist, philosopher, essayist, literary critic, and list-lover Umberto Eco has had a long fascination with the symbolic and the metaphorical, extending all the way back to his vintage semiotic children’s books. Half a century later, he revisits the mesmerism of the metaphorical and the symbolic in The Book of Legendary Lands (public library) — an illustrated voyage into history’s greatest imaginary places, with all their fanciful inhabitants and odd customs, on scales as large as the mythic continent Atlantis and as small as the fictional location of Sherlock Holmes’s apartment.
  • Inside The Most Interesting Man In The World’s Personal Library [31 Photos] | The Roosevelts  ” Jay Walker made a lot of money starting Priceline.com. He spent his money collecting. The collection, dubbed the Library of Human Imagination, has grown into something epic that rivals any museum on Earth. the 3,600 square foot, three story facility features multilevel tiers, “floating” platforms, connecting stairways, glass-paneled bridges, dynamic lighting and is bursting at the seams with artifacts of all types. A truly amazing collection that celebrates human endeavour and preserves it for future generations.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Useful Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Using the Sharetabs tool

I have been using a very simple little tool lately. I found it by accident on Larry Ferlazzo’s blog post about creating scavenger hunts. It is called ShareTabs – Share your links as tabs. It allows you to add a list of any links you may find when you are searching for information and submit it to get a single link to them all, ready for use. Last year I looked at Rollyofor creating a group of sites that students could search on particular topics, using their internet search skills. This site is for the times you are not concentrating on the searching skills but the skills of understanding/analysis/synthesis. sharetabs

 Share Tabs could be great way to save time with your classes. Rather than waiting for your students to find appropriate sites to begin their learning activity, you can find the best/most useful sites for your students ahead of time, copy the URL’s into the Sharetabs box and you will get one URLwhere all your links will be displayed. An example a sharetabs page that I created is a page for the poetry of WWI (for the year 10 teachers and students) who are studying the novel “All quiet on the Western Front” next term.

sharetabs-WWI

As can be seen it is very visual, displaying a thumbnail of the website link on the preview page, but also has tabs to open the links you specify, ready for classroom use. The students simply navigate between the tabs, at the top of the Sharetabs page, for the sites you have selected.  

This could also be simple and useful for sharing sites with other colleagues. It would make it very easy to share a collection of sites via Email,  Twitter, IM or SMS.

Wired for books – Listen to the authors

Wired for Books is a site that features a large collection of interviews with different authors as well as poems, stories, plays, essays and lectures, for children and adults. David Kurz created the the website to take advantage of the many literary events held at Ohio University and it has grown form there.

Many interviews were recorded by Don Swaim, as part of a CBS radio show called Book Beat. The site contains the original unedited interviews at lasted for about 30 mins. There are about 700 interviews available.

A growing collection of audio theatre presentations bring a better appreciation of the works of literature, including a recording of Shakespeare’s Macbeth by local actors and the Wizard of Oz by Wired for Books players.

Kid’s corner has some great things for kids, especially the Beatrix Potter tales, Grimms Fairy tales, a presentation of Dicken’s A Christmas Carol to name just a few.

This is an  excellent source of audiobooks and presentations for enthusiastic readers.