Shaun Tan’s new book The Singing Bones.

I have only just bought a copy of Shaun Tan’s new book, The Singing Bones. It is a change in style from the previous publications he has been involved in. The style of the illustrations are very Tan but the medium in which they were created is new. They are quite amazing but I will need to have more time to fully grasp what he has created as he tried to encapsulate the gist of each fairytale. As always the detail and power of his deceptively simple images is amazing. As I looked at them some seem familiar, appearing to be inspired by character drawings in his earlier publications, and others completely new and powerful in their strangeness. I am never disappointed with Shaun Tan’s works, he never ceases to inspire and challenge me as a reader.

The singing bones - Shaun Tan

Shaun Tan was approached to illustrate the German edition of a new Philip Pullman book. On his website Shaun explains how he became involved in the publication. It is interesting to read about how he came to the decision to create the illustrations for the book. It is a collection of many classic fairy tales re-told/envisioned by Philip Pullman with the title Grimms Märchen.

In the end there were more illustrations than were needed and so these were used to illustrate The Singing Bones.  Jack Zipes has written some short but potent interpretations of the fairytales to accompany the images.

There are other versions of this collection of classic fairytales re-told/envisioned by Philip Pullman under the title  Grimm Tales: For Young and Old but these are not illustrated with Shaun Tan’s wonderful figures. 

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Re-using old books and creating amazing art works

It’s Friday. As the school day ends I have been looking around pinterest and the wider web community for images. I am always looking for interesting views of books and/or libraries and I was very pleased that I came across a 2012 post by Pinar (@mymodernmetArtist), 5,000 Books Pour Out of a Building in Spain – My Modern Metropoli

The post offers some photos and explanation about how she did it as well as a video of the amazing sculptures by Spanish-based artist Alicia Martin. The Biografias (translated as Biographies) project used 5,000 books in each of three site-specific sculptures, all based in historic buildings in Madrid. You can see how the sculture works in the video below.

I also came across the following site this week that had some great artisitic uses for old books. I am not sure if I could actually bring myself to cut and re-use the books in some of these ways but I am impressed by what these artists did.

Re-Use of Books = Art is from the Inspiration Green site . There are some great photographs in here showing how artists have re-used old books to create some amazing art, including some more by Alicia Martin and the very creepy image by Waldo Lee (Walee) http://walee.com/v3/.

Waldo Lee, aka WALEE

So some more images to add to Pinterest board.

Sculptris: 3D modeling software

Tonight I have had some fun playing with a new tool. I will not be putting in my creation just yet as I need to do some work on them. At the moment they look more like something out of an alien movie.

From the Sculptris image library

From the Sculptris image library

The program I downloaded was called Sculptris. It is free 3D modeling software for Windows (there is no Mac option). Sculptris is designed to create models of sculptures and 3D objects with an almost hand-made aspect. It allows you to sculpt a figure in three dimensions,is based on a ball. It is really very simple and reasonably intuitive to use and requires no special knowledge of 3D modeling. I simply started to shape  the “ball” with the different tools just as though it were a block of clay.

The designer, Tomas Pettersson, created this application for his own enjoyment as a hobby and it is free. He does envisage developing it further and states that any donations to him would be used to help him fix any problems.  It amazes me that someone has spent so much time and effort creating these tools and are willing to share them with us.

It is an amazing tool and to get a better idea of how it works have a look at the videos below. They show, in a much more effective way than I can put into words, just how to create images using this program.

This looks as though it might be a good tool for students in the visual arts area. They could use this program to design models for claymation models or sculpture projects. I haven’t used it a lot but it might also be useful in other subject areas where models could be created such as geography, geology and science.

Artabase – finding out about the art world

artabase-home

Just a quick post tonight. I have been having a quick look at the Artabase site (found via the Creative Commons Australia site).

Artabase is a beta social networking site for artists, galleries and art lovers, creating a ‘one stop shop’ for news of exhibitions and events.

The Artabase site allows you to see what events are coming to your area by choosing states or regions for whatever (or whoever) and to view works by different artists in many fields, including photographers, painters, ‘videopoets,’ multimedia practitioners to name a few. There are community discussions that cover topics such as on-line arts resources and new gallery spaces. The blog keeps up wth news and reviews. The site included, in 2008:

  • 1170 Registered Users
  • 463 Exhibitions
  • 366 Artists
  • 157 Galleries
  • 194 Comments.

The art site also uses creative commons licenses for a percentage of the works featured.

Artabase announced its decision to allow images to be licensed under Creative Commonsin October 2007. According to Rebecca Cannon, Director of the site, approximately 12% of the images uploaded to Artabase to date have a Creative Commons licensed image. Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike is the most common licence chosen.

Artists benefit by being able to create a free profile and list their exhibitions in the calendar, which then remain in our archive for perpetuity. It worth having a look through if you have students who are looking for inspiration or examples of the many different approaches to art. It was easy to add a widget to my photoblog so that I get information visually and without have to go to the site all the time.

Copyright: Public Domain S.C.Jeltema 2006 Italy

Copyright: Public Domain S.C.Jeltema 2006 Italy